Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

Author Summary Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that, upon congenital infection, can cause severe neonatal birth defects. To better understand the early innate immune response to ZIKV, we compared infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) between a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate and historic isolates from Africa and Asia. Human DCs supported productive replication following infection with the contemporary strain and exhibited donor variability in viral replication, but not viral binding. While contemporary and historic Asian lineage viruses replicated similarly, the African strains displayed more rapid replication kinetics with higher infection magnitude and uniquely induced cell death. Minimal DC activation and antagonism of type I interferon (IFN) translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction of IFNB1 transcription and translation of other antiviral effector proteins. Treatment with a RIG-I agonist potently blocked ZIKV replication in human DCs, while type I IFN treatment was significantly less effective. Mechanistically, all ZIKV strains inhibited type I IFN receptor signaling through blockade of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation. Altogether, we found that while ZIKV efficiently evades type I IFN responses during infection of human DCs, RIG-I signaling remains capable of inducing a strong antiviral state.See it on Scoop.it, via Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells
Source: Viral Bioinformatics

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